Tag Archives: simply horses vet clinic

A Foal is a fragile thing

Although the weather feels like it is still winter, we are actually in the middle of the foaling season! The past couple of weeks we have seen many happy, healthy foals for mare and foal checks, the best part of this job! However, we have also seen some foals with health problems, some very serious. It’s important to remember a foal is programmed not to show any signs of illness or weakness, so it doesn’t attract the attention of predators.
This makes it difficult to spot signs that your foal is ill. Important signs to look out for are;

1) Changes in behavior of the foal

2) Not getting up when stimulated

3) Not drinking regularly

4) Showing signs of colic

5) Not following the mare around

you can look at the mare’s udder to see if the foal has been drinking recently. In the very early stages of a foals life it is vital to recognize that the foal is ill as soon as possible, as they are born without any energy reserves and will deteriorate very very quickly if they stop drinking from the mare.

mare and foal

Not a happy foal

I was called out by a concerned recently, the foal had been suckling and her behavior had been normal at first, but a couple of hours after the birth the foal started to lose interest in the mare and was very lethargic. This alert owner had spotted the difference in the foals behavior and called us out for an examination. After my clinical
exam I decided the foal was suffering from perinatal asphyxia syndrome, meaning it had been deprived of oxygen during the birth. It is typical for these foals that they look fine initially, but then slowly deteriorate to the point where they are not suckling anymore and
become very ill. This specific foal was very precious to the owner, so we decided to refer it to a large hospital so it could be monitored 24/7 and they could give it a permanent feeding tube, as the foal had stopped drinking. Thanks to the quick response of the owner
and the intensive therapy it received the foal is now back home and doing really well. We all love a happy ending!

This case also illustrates the importance of having the vet out after the foal is born for a mare and foal check, as subtle signs of illness will be picked up during the clinical exam of the foal. A lot of conditions in foals can be treated on the yard with good result, but the sooner treatment can be started the better!

PS if your mare is expecting a foal and you want some help and advice about the birth, here at Simply Horses we have a very useful foal package, consisting of detailed information about the birth process,
tips on what to do and what not to do, a discount voucher for a mare and foal check by one of our vets and lots of other goodies!

Well adjusted healthy foal

Well adjusted healthy foal

Simply Horses Vets – The benefits of Worm Egg Counts

Simply horses Vets: The Importance of Worm Egg Counts in your worming program

We are rolling out some new worm egg count kits and just wanted to give you a bit more information about why it is important to use them.

We are now seeing widespread resistance to wormers that are frequently used, which means that the wormers are no longer killing the worms. This is occurring everywhere, not just in the North East. As well as this problem, there are no new worming drugs currently being created. This means we need to worm responsibly and try to prevent further resistance developing, so the wormers we are using will remain effective.

It has been found that approximately 80% of the horses in a herd, grazing on the same field, will be producing 20% of the worm eggs on that field. This means the remaining 20% of horses are producing 80% of the worm eggs on the field. It is important to target the 20% and reduce the amount of contamination they are producing. This is done using worm egg counts (WEC).

A faecal sample needs to be collected from all horses on the pasture on the same day. This will then be sent to the laboratory to identify worm eggs. If a horse has a low count of eggs, then they do not need to be treated (saving you money and helping reduce resistance). The horses with high worm egg counts need to be treated.

WECs should be performed 3-4 times a year. Some horses have a low count on one sample, but a high count on subsequent samples. This is because the samples look for eggs that are only produced by mature adult worms. If worms are present that are not mature then the WEC will be low, but once they are mature, they will start producing eggs that are detected in a faecal sample.

To help reduce worm burden in your horse and the amount of wormer that needs to be used, it is important to poo pick your pasture as well. This is especially important when doing WECs. As the eggs are passed in faeces and horses become infected by ingesting these eggs, the pasture needs to poo picked at least twice weekly, but ideally daily, to reduce the egg contamination on the grazing.

Even though you are doing WECs, it is important to worm twice yearly with a tapeworm product. Tapeworm eggs do not show up well on a WEC, so the best way to ensure your horse is protected is to have a blood sample taken or worm regularly for tapeworm.

What to do if you think the worms are resistant to the wormer you are using? In these cases a WEC needs to be done before treatment and then another sample taken 14 days later and compared to the original sample.

The vets at Simply Horses are carrying these new kits in their cars they are £9.50 each and this will reduce to £8.75 if there are 6 or more horses on one yard tested. They are easy to use and have everything you need to send your sample to the lab, the results are back in 24 hours direct to Simply horses where one of our vets will interpret the results and contact you with them and give you the best possible advice on what is the best course of action for your horse.

The EasyShoe a Way To Shoe The Barefoot Horse | Simply Horses Vets

On the 19th February Simply Horses Vet clinic will be hosting the first live demonstration in the UK of the brand new revolutionary Easy Shoe from easy care.
A group of 20 local farriers will be having a practical demonstration on how to nail and glue these innovative shoes. At long last we have a shoe that is flexible and good for the hoof, for those horses we cannot boot or are unable to go totally barefoot for whatever reason.
We will be doing an online webinar / video after the event if anyone is interested.
For more information contact the clinic on easyshoe @ simply-horses.net
A new dawn in shoeing horses, at last a flexible shoe that allows the hoof to move, especially the heels so essential for good hoof function.

Introductory Video

 

Simply horses vaccine amnesty

Once again here at Simply Horses we are offering our clients in conjunction with Merial our vaccine suppliers the chance to get your horse vaccinated through the Vaccine Amnesty.
If your horse is over 12 months of age and has never been vaccinated or your vaccinations have lapsed then you can benefit from this offer. You pay for the first vaccination (this must be done during the month of October) Merial will pay for the second vaccination at 4-6 weeks (you will have visit costs if applicable) then you pay for the third vaccination in 5-7 months. This applies to Flu/Tet only NOT tetanus.
Please ring the clinic 0191 3859696 to take advantage of this offer. We have already had an outbreak of equine flu in the North East so this is a great chance to protect your horse in the future and help keep him as healthy as you can

Healthy horseser

Simply Horses Vets , Equine Education

Working for a certificate

Having been out of University for just over 4 years now, I decided it was time to go back to the books and study. I enrolled on a certificate in advanced veterinary practice (certAVP), that I could do from home while continuing to work. So I am now once again a student at the University of Liverpool.

simply horses vets study Loenardo horse and rider

The aim of the certAVP is to provide more in depth knowledge in a specific field of veterinary practice. As I am still in the early stages, I am learning more general information before going into a more in depth area of interest. Eventually I will be doing more specific work on medicine subjects, including hearts and lungs, colics, liver problems and several others.

I am sent weekly reading lists, along with weekly assignments. These vary from short responses, to longer case reports. I am also required to attend online meetings and online discussion boards with other vets enrolled on the certificate. These give me the opportunity to discuss alternative diagnoses and treatments with vets from this country and also those outside the UK working for the same certAVP.

I have been very lucky to have the help of my colleague, Keesjan, who started working for us a few months ago. He has done a lot of work in medicine (already holding certificates) and provides a lot of support for me when working up cases.

I hope that this certAVP will bring more to our clients and allow us to provide a better service to you all. In the mean time, it is back to the study for me as I have deadlines to meet!

Charlotte Stedman MRCVS

Education is a progressive discovery of our ignorance.Will Durant (1885-1981) U.S. author and historian.

Horse insurance – cheapest isn’t always best

Finding the right horse insurance…..Not an easy task!

I have just recently bought a new horse and as he hopefully will keep me going for quite a few years decided that he needed to be insured, so I spent the week leading up to his collection trawling the internet for quotes and this really did open my eyes.

This is despite working or years at equine vets including Simply Horses Vet Clinic and dealing with lots of insurance claims.

The first main thing I found was to “read the small print” and I might add with some companies the small print was VERY small indeed, bring out the magnifying glass. What at first glance seemed a really good deal on further reading really was not! There were lots of exclusions to the policies and I mean lots, some didn’t have fixed excess instead it was a percentage of the claim, which if your horse needed surgery for whatever then I would have ended up with a hefty bill at the end which was the whole point of insuring my horse in the first place, some had limited pay out for diagnostics, some even only paid for the initial vet visit and no follow up treatment what so ever, what good was that?

As veterinary fees have risen there has been an increase in “budget” insurance policies which seem to give the minimum cover, so although the premiums are cheaper this may not be cost effective in the long run.

Most of the larger insurance companies that specialise in equine cover had very easy to navigate sites and I was able to tailor my cover to my needs, what activities I was going to use this new horse for, did I want remedial shoeing covered, complementary treatments and the extra cost of bedding if he had to be on box rest this all went into the mix and of course public liability is included on most of the larger companies which is peace of mind when out hacking if you end up in the awful situation of damaging a vehicle.

Another good pointer is speak to your horsey friends and ask who they use and what it covers, also ask your vet for advise although they are not allowed to “push” a specific company they will tell you the names of companies that offer good cover. There are discounts to pick up too if you make a one off payment instead of monthly, I managed a bit more discount as I already had my vehicle and trailer insured with them there is no harm asking what discounts are to be had.

Happy Simply horses clients, confident with their insurance

Happy Simply horses clients, confident with their insurance

 

So in a nutshell

• Can you afford not to insure your horse?
• Cheaper isn’t always best
• Insure for your needs
• Read the small print
• Go with an equine specialist

I learnt a lot from my hours spent looking but it was time well spent, I know I have the best cover for my horse for the activities I intend to do.

Revolutionary Mud Fever Treatment From Fabtek At SimplyHorses

Further to our post earlier in the year  http://www.eq9vet.com/mud-fever we spent most of last winter trying out a new form of dressing with a special composition of activated charcoal and very small pieces of crystalline silver called Mudtek and Meditek in some of our severe cases of Mud fever and lymphangitis. These dressings have worked very well and started to be our first line of treatment for such conditions.

For more information go to the main web site at Fabtek Solutions or ring the clinic on 0191 385 9696 for more information or if you have a horse with Mud Fever related issues.

We will be updating this post over the next few months as our experience grows on using this new product.

Paul